Initiatives

Aprendiendo Juntos Council

The Aprendiendo Juntos (“Learning Together”) Council is a multi-sector group of researchers, practitioners, and policy experts who seek to identify new models and practical strategies to improve educational outcomes for Hispanic-Latino families through the wise deployment of digital technologies.  The Council will utilize its diverse composition to translate cutting-edge research in order to influence public and private sector investments in programs and practices that work.

In June 2012, the National Center for Family Literacy (NCFL) convened the first Hispanic-Latino Families and Digital Technologies Forum in partnership with the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop and the National Council of La Raza. The Forum brought together some of our nation’s best researchers, innovators, thought leaders, and educators dedicated to the vital topic of how and in which contexts today’s Hispanic-Latino families are learning from the rapidly changing innovations in information communications technologies. The discussion from the Forum continued throughout 2012 and into April 2013, when the Aprendiendo Juntos Council was established as a new working group. The group met again in February 2014 to continue the discussion and implement an action plan to deepen understanding of the important contextual factors surrounding Hispanic-Latino families and digital technologies.

The Council’s near term goals include the development of new qualitative and quantitative studies on a regional and national basis that focus on Hispanic-Latino families and digital technologies.  Council members have completed a literature review and are now conducting a systematic review evaluating existing research and model programs that will serve as case exemplars on the uses of digital technologies to support children’s learning and healthy development.   In Summer 2013, Council members began field studies examining the roll-out of the national Connect2Compete broadband access initiative in select districts in California and Arizona. The Council will also complete the analysis of a national survey of Latino parents’ uses of media with their children ages 0-10, to be released in the Fall of 2014.